The Jacobite Movement in Scotland and in Exile, 1746–1759 by D. Zimmermann

By D. Zimmermann

The argument provided during this publication arose from an extension to the query no matter if the suppression of the Jacobite emerging of 1745-46, as represented through a long-standing historiographical consensus, spelled the top of Jacobite hopes, and British fears, of one other recovery test. The critical end of this booklet is that the Jacobite stream continued as a conceivable risk to the British kingdom, and used to be perceived as such by means of its rivals to 1759.

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The Jacobite Movement in Scotland and in Exile, 1746–1759

The argument provided during this booklet arose from an extension to the query even if the suppression of the Jacobite emerging of 1745-46, as represented via a long-standing historiographical consensus, spelled the tip of Jacobite hopes, and British fears, of one other recovery test. The important end of this booklet is that the Jacobite move persevered as a possible probability to the British country, and used to be perceived as such via its competitors to 1759.

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At this point, it seems sensible to stress the common, anti-Whig denominator of Jacobite raids in Argyllshire, and to offer the suggestion that they were indeed acts of political, rather than social, banditry. In this particular sense, these raids can be classed as acts of retaliation. 100 Jacobite cattle-lifting, one could argue, was born of necessity and the desperation of 36 The Jacobite Movement in Scotland and in Exile undernourished clansmen on the run. Conversely, no measure could hurt the Hanoverian loyalists more than to have their livestock carried away.

Indeed, Jacobite activities were recorded long after the battle of Culloden was fought. Endeavours to resuscitate the rising were under way from the day of the battle into the month of May 1746, and beyond. The eventual collapse of organized resistance was occasioned by the mounting military pressure exerted by the British forces in the Highlands, the failure of Charles to rally his troops when it was still possible, and, more generally, the prevailing disunity among the leaders of his army. After this first phase of decline, Jacobite resistance assumed a different shape, its nature becoming sporadic and localized.

106 Conversely, Scottish collaborators often paid dearly for their services to the British. On 27 May, the St James’s Evening Post reported that ‘[a] Countryman near Cullen, who had been very serviceable in giving Intelligence to his Royal Highness the Duke, was last Week called from his Bed, and in the Cloud of Night was barbarously murdered’, while the Laird of MacLeod related to Lord Loudon that ‘your Spy M’rath was hanged . . 108 Two incidents occurring in the late summer stung the British worse than even the increase of cattle-raids in the Highlands, or the continued evasion of the Disarming Act.

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