A popular dictionary of Sikhism by Cole, William Owen; Sambhi, Piara Singh

By Cole, William Owen; Sambhi, Piara Singh

The be aware 'sikh' comes from the Punjabi verb 'sikhna', to profit. A Sikh is for this reason a learner, that's, onewho learns and follows the trail of liberation taught through a guy referred to as Gur N nak and his 9 successors, who lived within the Punjab quarter of India among 1469 and 1708. The Sikh faith has just recently come to the tutorial realization of western students. there have been a fewbooks written ahead of M.A. Read more...

summary: The observe 'sikh' comes from the Punjabi verb 'sikhna', to profit. A Sikh is accordingly a learner, that's, onewho learns and follows the trail of liberation taught through a guy known as Gur N nak and his 9 successors, who lived within the Punjab sector of India among 1469 and 1708. The Sikh faith has only in the near past come to the tutorial consciousness of western students. there have been a fewbooks written ahead of M.A. Macauliffe's huge research of the lives and instances of the Gur s, The SikhReligion (Oxford 1909), yet those have been usually the paintings of infantrymen or directors, like Macauliffehimself, who neede

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The name Gobind may indicate the Guru’s hopes for the future. However, in 1605 Akbar died, his successor had Guru Arjan executed, and the young sixth Guru found himself leading the Sikhs in a new and unexpected situation. He symbolically wore two swords, representing temporal and spiritual authority, as part of his regalia, and kept a standing army. One of his titles was Sacha Padshah, True Emperor, which was among those used by Mughal emperors. Guru Ram Das was addressed by this name but now, with the Guru holding court and using ambassadors, it must have assumed a new significance.

37 The above quotations may reject the concept of avatar and the claims of human Gurus to have divine qualities but they also assert the principle that divine revelation may be found in Hinduism and Islam, the forms of religion of which the Sikh Gurus had first-hand experience. Secondly, the word is used of the ten human Gurus. Though only seven of them, including Guru Gobind Singh, were men through whom the gurbani was revealed, all are regarded as being of equal standing as messengers of God.

Jati is applied to the subgroup to which one belongs. It is usually occupational. In practice, for most people jati matters more than varna, the notable exceptions being the brahmins and the outcastes. The two important principles of the varna-jati system are purity (and therefore pollution), and hierarchy. The Gurus condemned the system, emphasizing that the accident of birth should not determine a person’s worth. Guru Nanak taught, ‘Caste is preposterous and renown vain; only the Lord gives all beings protection’ (AG 83).

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